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Posts Tagged ‘Tips for manual testers working in an agile environment book’

New book: Tips for manual testers working in an agile environment

Posted by Matt Archer on September 12, 2013

Tips for manual testers working in an agile environment bookI recently decided to write a short book inspired by some of the topics from the Techniques for Agile Manual Testers course that I have been running with the Ministry of Testing and Pretty Good Testing.  The book is called “Tips for manual testers working in an agile environment” and is available to purchase via LeanPub.

One of the ideas behind LeanPub is to publish a book gradually over time, which I fully intend to do.  If you are interested to read the book as I write it, check out the landing page for the book on LeanPub and purchase the book whilst it is still cheap (currently $1.49) but obviously incomplete (currently 15 tips).  One of the nice things about LeanPub is that if you buy an early version of a book at a reduced price you are entitled to subsequent updates for free, including the final version of the book.  A full list of the tips that will be available in the final version of the book can be found here.

If you have any questions, comments or suggestions, you are welcome to leave a message here on my blog, email me at matt (at) expresssoftware (dot) co.uk or ping me on Twitter (@MattArcherUK).  Whilst on the subject of twitter I plan to use the hash tag #AgileManualTesters whenever I tweet anything related to the book.  I know it’s a little long for a hashtag, but I’m struggling to think of anything shorter, yet still meaningful.  Hopefully a shorter version will evolve over time!

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#AgileManualTesters book update: Tip 34 (Enrich your knowledge and expectations using multiple oracles) now available

Posted by Matt Archer on September 16, 2013

Version 7 of the “Tips for manual testers working in an agile environment” book is now available.

This update includes Tip 34 (“Enrich your knowledge and expectations using multiple oracles”).

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Tip 11 (“Following an exploratory approach to your testing”) added to my #AgileManualTesters book

Posted by Matt Archer on September 20, 2013

Version 8 of my “Tips for manual testers working in an agile environment” book is now available.

This update includes Tip 11 (“Following an exploratory approach to your testing”).

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Version 12 of “Tips For Manual Testers Working in an Agile Environment” now live

Posted by Matt Archer on November 21, 2013

Version 12 of my “Tips for manual testers working in an agile environment” book is now available.

This update includes Tip 8 (“Before you document information, question who it is for”).

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Tips for manual testers working in an agile environment book now 50% complete

Posted by Matt Archer on February 20, 2014

A few months ago I started writing a short book entitled “tips for manual testers working in an agile environment“. Rather than wait until it was finished and then reveal it to the world, I decided to use Leanpub to progressively publish the book as I was writing it.

The book now includes 25 of the planned 50 tips. If you are interested to take a look, you can find the book’s home page here.  You will also find below a list of the tips that I have currently written. Ten of those tips are available within the free sample, with all 25 tips included in the full version which can be purchased for a nominal, pre-publication fee.

If you have any questions, comments or suggestions related to the book, you are welcome to leave a message here on my blog, email me at matt (at) expresssoftware (dot) co.uk or ping me on Twitter (@MattArcherUK).

 

The following tips are available in the current version of the book.

Tip 1: Appreciate that an agile tester never blindly follows a tip or practice

Tip 2: Tailor your agile testing practices to meet your specific needs

Tip 3: Understand the risks associated with manual test scripts

Tip 4: When testing (or preparing) don’t allow yourself to be blocked

Tip 6: Enrich your knowledge and expectations using multiple oracles

Tip 8: Before you document information, question who it is for

Tip 9: Help your team by undertaking work that isn’t testing

Tip 11: Follow an exploratory approach to your testing

Tip 14: Be cautious of any sprint that is organised like a waterfall

Tip 16: Share common information with other members of the team

Tip 17: Use traditional testing tools in a way that makes you agile

Tip 21: Use self-generated maps to help organise your testing

Tip 24: Resist overlaying traditional testing processes onto a sprint

Tip 26: Describe tests using design techniques and a coverage target

Tip 27: Learn how to spot risky automation: an upside-down pyramid

Tip 28: Learn how to spot risky automation: infrequent execution

Tip 30: Consider visual ways of representing your tests

Tip 32: However you document your manual tests, don’t repeat yourself

Tip 33: Attend the daily stand-up to keep in sync with your team

Tip 34: Be prepared to occasionally trade testing early for technical debt

Tip 38: Question the efficiency of representing each test separately

Tip 41: Test multiple stories together to uncover different perspectives

Tip 42: When you describe your tests, don’t just copy existing documents

Tip 46: Use existing documents as a canvas for test ideas and bug reports

 

The tips below are currently being written and will be included in a future version of the book.

Tip 5: Don’t try to test so quickly that you slow yourself down

Tip 7: Favour dedicated learning resources to educate new testers

Tip 10: Ask questions, but if nobody knows the answer, research yourself

Tip 12: Keep supporting information in a single place (not in your tests)

Tip 13: Set testing objectives that realistically align with regular releases

Tip 15: Look to automated tests for inspiration for manual test ideas

Tip 18: Ask yourself what you can do to improve overall team performance

Tip 19: Learn how your software works under the covers

Tip 20: Value demonstrations over written explanations

Tip 22: Look for opportunities to generalise less relevant interactions

Tip 23: Offer to demonstrate the team’s software to your customer

Tip 25: Consider using the gherkin notation to record manual tests

Tip 29: Learn how to spot risky automation: most runs “fail”

Tip 31: Use abstractions to help you plan, but don’t lose focus on reality

Tip 35: Build a support network of people that can aid your testing

Tip 36: Invent a multi-dimensional scale to discuss documentation detail

Tip 37: Familiarise yourself with how agile teams organise “requirements”

Tip 39: Appreciate examples, even those that aren’t automated

Tip 40: Regularly remind people that testing is everyone’s responsibility

Tip 43: Agree a simple means of visually tracking your testing

Tip 44: Encourage your team to automate their build and deployment

Tip 45: Agree a place for everything and keep everything in its place

Tip 47: Consider bringing many tests together into a single checklist

Tip 48: Try to avoid requesting unwanted features via the backdoor

Tip 49: [To be confirmed]

Tip 50: “Live as if you were to die tomorrow, learn as if you were to live forever”

 

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